12 04 2014
World Beer Cup silver medal: Koyt - Kuit - Kuyt (Witte Klavervier)

It's been two years now, since the old beer-style Koyt has come back to the Netherlands. In 2013 we won the title 'Best Koyt beer of the Netherlands'. This time we won a Silver medal at the World Beer Cup in Denver out of 37 entries!

A very welcome encouragement to continue developing this Dutch style. This was only the very first generation of true Koyt beers and there's enough to do to get it to a higher level. On the first of june we'll defend our title of 'Best Koyt beer of the Netherlands' and perhaps pass it on to the competition.

Two of them have started their own brewery recently and we name them in particular: Oersoep and Ramses brewery. As experimental and innovative brewers they and others took the challenge of brewing this indigenous oat beer. This years winners will present their beer at the Salone del Gusto thanks to Slow Food the Netherlands.

This year we hope to present a rechearch project together with farmers, seed breeders and Wageningen University Rechearch. We want more knowledge about the main ingredient of our beer, a 'lost grain' in the Netherlands, special brewing oats. This way we hope to learn and improve our beer in the long term. Next to that we'll introduce a more modern version of this Classic Koyt, this time with American hops.

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Netherlands Kuit beer guidelines
(compiled by D. Walsh, 10 jan, 2013)

The grain bill must contain a minimum of:
A minimum of 45% by wt. of oats, oat flakes or oat malt
a minimum of 20% by wt. of wheat or malted wheat
a maximum of 35% by wt. of Pilsner or Pale Ale malt.
The original gravity / stamwort of the beer must be between 1.050 en 1.080 s.g. / 12.40 – 19.30 ° Plato.
The alcohol content must be between 4,7 en 7,9 vol% zijn. (based on a brewhouse efficiency of approx. 65% and an apparent degree of fermentation of approx. 74%).
The colour of the beer must be between 10 EBC (blond) and 25 EBC (gold/amber). A colour above 15 EBC can be attained using a long boil over an open fire (as done in the middle ages) and not from the grains or malts.
The beer must be fermented with a neutral ale yeast (e.g. not with a Bavarian Wheat beer strain).
The beer is relatively bitter however, hop aroma should stronger than hop bitterness.
Only the following older European (noble) hop varieties may be used:
Hallertau Mittelfrüh
Saaz Saaz
Tettnang Tettnang
Spalt Spalt
East Kent Goldings
Hop bitterness must be between 25 and 35 EBU.
No herbs, spices, fruits or other foodstuffs (other that the ingredients listed above) may be used.
The beer may be slightly hazy in clarity.
The beer must have at least a thin layer of stable foam.


The following information over brewing Oat beers has been extracted from ‘The Use of Oats in Brewing’ in Monatsschift fur Brauwissenschaft March/April, 2005 article:

It is recommended to use a (thin) mash thickness of at least 4L/kg. to prevent clumps of dry grain forming during mashing.

The following mash schedule (tested on 100% by wt. oat beers) delivered optimal results:
35° C voor 20 min,
45° C voor 20 min,
52° C voor 15 min,
62° C voor 5 min,
72° C voor 10 min,
78° C voor 5 min.

Sparging/filtration should normally present no difficulties except for the fact that the total spent grains volume will be slightly larger than for normal mashes.
The extract for oats is approx. 20% lower than for barley malt.
The flavour is unique and conjures up associations with: mint, grainy bitterness and paper.
Protein haze will result in a beer that will appear (and remain) slightly cloudy.


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29 01 2013
Participating breweries

The CNB challenges all Dutch brewers (and all others) to present a true Dutch Kuyt beer, following the guidelines below, during the 'Week of Dutch Beer' in the Hague, later this year. Below is a list of participating brewers:

'How to save a beer style; There is no set procedure, but it starts with writing about it' (Michael Jackson)

Brouwerij De Hemel
Jopen
Witte Klavervier
Apeldoornse Stadsbrouwerij
Ramses
Oersoep
Klein Duimpje
StiBON (via de Prael)
PINT (via De Leckere)
De Pelgrim
Bierbrouwerij Vijfhuizen
Bier Atelier Vijfheerenlanden
Burg Bier Brouwerij
Leidsch Bier
Sallandse Landbier Brouwerij
Brouwerij de Heerlijkheid
De Naeckte Brouwers
Huisbrouwerij Mieghelm
Bijdehand Brouwerij

Proefbrouwerij Het Vaghevuur
Brouwerij Dampegheest

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Netherlands Koyt beer guidelines
(compiled by D. Walsh, 10 jan, 2013)

The grain bill must contain a minimum of:
A minimum of 45% by wt. of oats, oat flakes or oat malt
a minimum of 20% by wt. of wheat or malted wheat
a maximum of 35% by wt. of Pilsner or Pale Ale malt.
The original gravity / stamwort of the beer must be between 1.050 en 1.080 s.g. / 12.40 – 19.30 ° Plato.
The alcohol content must be between 4,7 en 7,9 vol% zijn. (based on a brewhouse efficiency of approx. 65% and an apparent degree of fermentation of approx. 74%).
The colour of the beer must be between 10 EBC (blond) and 25 EBC (gold/amber). A colour above 15 EBC can be attained using a long boil over an open fire (as done in the middle ages) and not from the grains or malts.
The beer must be fermented with a neutral ale yeast (e.g. not with a Bavarian Wheat beer strain).
The beer is relatively bitter however, hop aroma should stronger than hop bitterness.
Only the following older European (noble) hop varieties may be used:
Hallertau Mittelfrüh
Saaz Saaz
Tettnang Tettnang
Spalt Spalt
East Kent Goldings
Hop bitterness must be between 25 and 35 EBU.
No herbs, spices, fruits or other foodstuffs (other that the ingredients listed above) may be used.
The beer may be slightly hazy in clarity.
The beer must have at least a thin layer of stable foam.


The following information over brewing Oat beers has been extracted from ‘The Use of Oats in Brewing’ in Monatsschift fur Brauwissenschaft March/April, 2005 article:

It is recommended to use a (thin) mash thickness of at least 4L/kg. to prevent clumps of dry grain forming during mashing.

The following mash schedule (tested on 100% by wt. oat beers) delivered optimal results:
35° C voor 20 min,
45° C voor 20 min,
52° C voor 15 min,
62° C voor 5 min,
72° C voor 10 min,
78° C voor 5 min.

Sparging/filtration should normally present no difficulties except for the fact that the total spent grains volume will be slightly larger than for normal mashes.
The extract for oats is approx. 20% lower than for barley malt.
The flavour is unique and conjures up associations with: mint, grainy bitterness and paper.
Protein haze will result in a beer that will appear (and remain) slightly cloudy.


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30 11 2012

Campaign for Netherlands Beer styles CNB
Nowadays Kuitenbrouwer (Kuit brewer) is a common surname even though most contemporary Dutch brewers don’t brew it. The Netherlands, together with the Frisian Hanseatic cities, formed the roots of today’s craft beer.
Historian Leen Alberts: 'Kuit beer is the grandfather of Dutch beers. It was the most common beer in the 15th and 16th century and must have been the basis for later beers.'

The following references which date back to the mid-19th century indicate that it is a style with an enormously long life-span (approximately 500 years).

'…and in Zwolle today (1790) there is still a very thin and also very appealing white beer brewed under this name.'

'A special kind of beer by this name (koyte), is known in parts of Westphalen today (1848).'

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26 11 2012
Campaign for Netherlands Beer styles CNB
During the second CNB meeting in De Hemel brewery in the city of Nijmegen the decision was made to brew Dutch Kuit beer again. With a sound historical basis, style definitions are to be set up in the coming weeks. Typical Kuit was made with hops and around 50% oats.

Kuit beer was an innovative beer-style in the 15th century with modern ingredients like hops and barley malt. It went through many changes over time and differed somewhat from place to place. It can be considered the grandfather of modern craft beer.

Around the first half of 2013 we'll see if we're able to brew a proper Kuit beer once again. The brewers at the meeting will participate, but the intention is to make it an open competition and bring back the old forgotten style. We expect to publish clear style definitions soon.

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29 10 2012
Campaign for Netherlands Beer styles CNB
CNB is an initiative of Michel Ordeman (Jopen brewery) and Frederik Ruis (Witte Klavervier brewery) and is meant to generate an awareness of (almost) forgotten Dutch beer history and beer styles.
Partiticipants are historians, brewers and journalists. The 1st meeting was at the Harlem Jopen brewery on the 22nd of June in 2012, followed by a 2nd in Nijmegen at the De Hemel brewery on the 23rd of November in 2012.
With knowledge of the past and a sound historic perspective one is able to make more informed decisions and promote the renaissance of Dutch beer. Over the past few years a lot of new information has become available and many new insights have emerged. More information will follow shortly.

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03 10 2012
The Poorter was ready for filling and we filled the first barrel today. They eventually weigh like 230 kilos per piece and it's good to be able to climb on top of one when filling. We made a small movie of the whole thing.

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29 09 2012
We bought fresh emptied bourbon barrels from the famous The Molen brewery and today we made a sturdy platform to hold the barrels. We underestimated the work and were busy all day long.

wk4-vaten-ba

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20 09 2012
Today we made beer especially for barrel aging; the new Barrel Aged Poorter. Ruud van de Gevel welcomed us and we got help from Oskar Moerman. Right until the last moment we were busy translating the recipe to a different quantity setup.
Oskar did some measurements and put the recipe into his Brouwvisie Pro (Brewvision Pro) software. Great to see different people from the Dutch brew-scene cooperate so good to get a nice character-full beer that stands out.

wild-turkey

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06 09 2012
Hopharvest in Epe, the Netherlands
For the second consecutive year we tried the get some fresh hops from the Epen field near Zwolle, the Netherlands, again without success. Local hops in our beer is a matter of a lot of patience. There's just not enough hops out of what is now only a test field. The 2012 harvest goes entirely to the famous De Molen brewery; cheers guys!
The Epe hop garden is potentially the biggest in the Netherlands and the owner is about to take next step. A development we support by all means!
A hop garden operation is no easy matter. One has to deal with all kinds of diseases, an export ban on rhizomes, expensive certification procedures and low market prices. Meanwhile we of the brewery and our friends in Epe just go on; these local hops are going to get there anyway.

hopoogst-epe-2012a
The small amounts of hopsflowers are harvested and sorted by hand.

A short video is on our YouTube channel.

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04 04 2012
With whisky expert Hans Offringa and brewmaster Peter van den Eijnden we tasted the Barrel Aged Poorter. Without expectations we tasted something that would have gone down the drain without further ado. What a pleasant surprise something very nice had formed.
Peter analysed the beer and the alcohol by volume appeared to have gone up from 7 to 7.5%. That is relatively small to the somewhat alcoholic BA beers others make. Perhaps also because of that there is room for al kinds of different flavors.

The Poorter was brewed on 30 11 2011
Filled on George Dickel Barrels 16 01 2012

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